Visual Arts Winter Exhibitions 2012

January 28 - April 15, 2012

Grace Eun Mi Lee, Dust (detail), 2011, part of the exhibition LOOK out. Image courtesy of the artist.

LOOK out

Lizz Aston, Jesse Bromm, George Cho, Clayton Haigh,
Jen Kneulman, Grace Eun Mi Lee, Shuyu Lu,
Janet Macpherson, Meredith Robb

Curated by Melanie Egan and Patrick Macaulay

> Profiles

An exhibition by nine artists positioned on the vanguard of contemporary craft practice.

To “look out” could be a command to get out of the way or it could describe a vantage point to see a long distance. This is an apt title to describe the exhibition of these nine artists. The work is both aggressively big and bold and the thinking and making behind it is pioneering and forwardly looking.

The creative process is reciprocal, part introversion and extrospection. Artists look within for meaning and without for inspiration. From their perspective, new directions, modes of thinking and approaches to making are constantly being explored. Although the works in LOOK out do not strictly adhere to specific readings, they were perceived through a literal or abstract lens juxtaposing ideas about process, materials, value and scale.

What happens when we take the time to look? What resonates within us? So many things are not what they seem and a mere glance is just not enough.

Profiles

Lizz Aston

Manipulating photographs of her own textile work, Aston expands on these predetermined patterns. By altering line, shape, volume, repetition and scale she deconstructs these formal patterns in unexpected ways and creates three-dimensional, large-scale works.

Sheridan Institute: Crafts and Design – Textiles
Harbourfront Centre’s artist-in-residence programme since 2009

lizzaston.com

Jesse Bromm

Bromm’s work reflects his inner discomfort and perception of the outside world. He creates miniature dioramas of human behavior that address these concerns. Figures are tangible and relatable, but the found objects are hidden; mediated by the glass’s quality to distort. The glass becomes a metaphor for our altered perception of reality.

Sheridan Institute: Crafts and Design – Glass
Harbourfront Centre’s artist-in-residence programme since 2011

bromm.ca

George Cho

Cho’s ceramics are steeped and infused with the preconceived constructs of the classical values and traditions of ceramics. Within this work he reflects a balanced and critical approach to communicating an understanding of this history and injects his own personal narrative.

Sheridan Institute: Crafts and Design – Ceramics
NSCAD University – BFA Ceramics
NSCAD-Lunenburg Community Studio Residency 2010
Harbourfront Centre’s artist-in-residence programme since 2011

Clayton Haigh

Haigh’s artistic career consists of paths and opportunities taken and missed. While young, playing with favorite toys, he had no idea he would be led to unimagined places. This work symbolizes a simpler time filled with comfort and nostalgia. Using the children’s toy Lite-Brite as inspiration, Haigh explores the properties of glass and light.

Sheridan Institute: Crafts and Design – Glass
Haliburton School of the Arts’ Artist-blacksmithing program
Harbourfront Centre’s artist-in-residence programme since 2009

balanceglassworks.com

Jen Kneulman

The material waste that occurs in constructing textiles is an inevitable element in Kneulman’s work. Misprints, flawed fabric, selvedges and cut threads are not discarded. She repurposes these scraps to create samplers using the technique of drawn threadwork. The pairing of reclaimed fabric with a laborious method of re-integrating threads questions what “waste” means in relation to time and material.

OCAD University – Material Art and Design – Textiles
Harbourfront Centre’s artist-in-residence programme since 2009

freshlyprinted.ca

Grace Eun Mi Lee

Lee’s interests focus on the unnoticed details of our everyday lives. Her curious shapes represent microscopic dust – ubiquitous and insignificant. These fantastical creatures are reminiscent of a combination of plant and human forms their characteristics and folkloric imagery that gives shape to what is overlooked or ignored.

Suwon University – BFA, Craft Design
Hongik University – MFA, Ceramics
Harbourfront Centre’s artist-in-residence programme since 2011

eunmilim.com

Shuyu Lu

Lu utilizes archetypal Chinese images and embroiders them onto 18th century French Toile de Jouy. Harmony and awkwardness are juxtaposed. Her work creates numerous relationships – the handmade vs. mass production, old vs. new, east vs. west, traditional vs. contemporary and slow vs. fast.

OCAD University – Material Art and Design – Textiles
Harbourfront Centre’s artist-in-residence programme since 2009

shuyulu.com

Janet Macpherson

Macpherson makes casts of ceramic forms from existing found toy animals and then reassembles them in unusual ways; placing objects that are familiar and strange in new and alien contexts. Sunk into amorphous structures, grafted onto forms, these manipulated and fragmented creatures cling perilously to the wall.

York University – BA Philosophy
Sheridan Institute: Crafts and Design – Ceramics
Ohio State University – MFA  Ceramics.
Harbourfront Centre’s artist-in-residence programme since 2011

janetmacpherson.com

Meredith Robb

Robb’s work is an examination of supposed worth. Jewellery often involves an intrinsic material cost and labourious process in its making. Sometimes, there is a negative correlation between the two. This work challenges societal perceptions of what determines value.

Mount Allison University – BA Philosophy
NSCAD University – BFA – Jewellery Design & Metalsmithing
Harbourfront Centre’s artist-in-residence programme since 2009

meredithrobb.com

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