My Arm

Tim Crouch

England

About the Performance

Endlessly curious about the possibilities of stage and audience, Tim Crouch is not just a superlative actor. He is perhaps one of the most influential experimental playwrights working in the English language today. His Obie- and Fringe First Award-winning work of the last decade includes the polarizing Royal Court production, The Author, as well as An Oak Tree, which casts a new actor in its central role every night.

The secret of Crouch’s impact is his insistence that the most interesting effect of theatre occurs in the minds of the audience, in the collective capacity for imagination. My Arm, his first play, is the story of a man who has lived for thirty years with one arm above his head, told with all the authenticity and detail of a first-person autobiography. Performing this important production for the first time in North America in almost ten years, Crouch leaves his arms casually by his sides.

Relaxed-Performance-icon-copyrelaxed performance of this production will take place on April 22 at 4pm.
Supported by

British Council

About Tim Crouch

Playwright, director and performer

Tim was an actor for many years before starting to write – and he still performs in much of his work.  His plays include My Arm, ENGLAND (a play for galleries), the OBIE award winning An Oak Tree, The Author, Adler & Gibb and (with Andy Smith) what happens to the hope at the end of the evening. Tim tours his work nationally and internationally. He also writes for younger audiences. A series of plays inspired by Shakespeare’s lesser characters includes I, Malvolio and I, Peaseblossom.  For the Royal Shakespeare Company, Tim has directed The Taming of the Shrew, King Lear and I, Cinna (the poet) – all for young audiences.  Other directing credits include Jeramee, Hartleby and Oooglemore for the Unicorn Theatre and The Complete Deaths for Spymonkey. Tim is published by Oberon Books.

timcrouchtheatre.co.uk

Extras

My Arm – Pre-show Tea

Tuesday, April 18, 2017 – 7pm

The more experimental a performance presents itself as, the more it can feel like a kind of con. Are these strange performers truly creating art, or — if some critics are to be believed — are they gaming the system to get paid for useless nonsense? Is art, to quote Tim Crouch out of context, simply “anything you can get away with”? Before the opening performance of Crouch’s My Arm, join Scholar-in-Residence Matt Sergi for a structured opportunity to share with fellow audience members your opinions, inspirations, and even frustrations for what performance makers “get away with,” or to defend such artistic roguery as a cultural necessity.

My Arm – Talkshow

Wednesday, April 19, 2017 – After the show

Following this evening’s performance, connect with the artists as they field your questions and discuss the work you’ve just seen. It’s the most direct behind-the-scenes access you can get. Admission is free with the purchase of your ticket.